About Rose F

Rose B. Fischer is speculative fiction author and creative entrepreneur. Her current project is The Foxes of Synn, a low-tech science fantasy serial. Click here for more information. She is a survivor of domestic violence who lives with multiple disabilities. Visit rosebfischer.com for more!

Redefining Disability: How to Make Halloween Accessible to Wheelchair Users

Redefining Disability2

Last week I posted some images of costumes for kids (of all ages) using wheelchairs. Response to that post was pretty high both on and off WordPress. I got several comments about how people see the costumes as positive because they’re “more inclusive” and that “Halloween should be for everyone.”

I agree that Halloween should be for everyone. Any cultural holiday or activity should be accessible to all. With that said, I think there’s a lot more to being inclusive about Halloween activities than just making some costumes that include the wheelchair as prop.

Like I said in a comment on last week’s post, I never felt excluded from dressing up. If I wanted to dress as a superhero or whatever, my mom could have just gotten me the same costume as any other kid, which is what I preferred anyway.  Some people do want to have a costume that includes the wheelchair, and that’s about personal preference. I don’t see it as an inclusion/exclusion issue.

 

There’s no reason a wheelchair would prevent someone from dressing up if they wanted to. The wheelchair just happens to provide an opportunity for more creative/cooler costumes.

There is an inclusion issue related to Halloween though, and it has to do with accessibility of activities like trick-or-treating or haunted houses (or party games in general.)

When I was growing up, we lived in neighborhoods where most homes were apartment buildings. There were no elevators, so the best I could do was knock at the doors on the first floor and then wait downstairs while my siblings and other kids hit the upper floors. I think I only did that for one or two years before I decided that it wasn’t worth the hassle because I didn’t have any fun sitting downstairs by myself all night.

Denise has a post about visitible homes here. Most folks are not going to be able to redesign their homes to make them more accessible, so here are my suggestions.

  • Set up a candy stand or booth in your yard where kids can stop rather than having to climb the stairs or go up on your porch. Have adults in costume take turns handing out candy this way.
  • Set up your yard as an outdoor haunted house or maze. Use a tarp and offer warm drinks in case of bad weather.
  • Hold a party where everyone brings a bag of candy rather than a trick-or-treating event. Let the kids pick which candies they want or let them make up their own favor bags as a party activity.

Next week is an off week. After that, I’ll be posting about wheelchair accessible games and activities.

#RedefiningDisability Awareness Challenge — Week Six

Originally posted on The Rattling Bones:

redefining-disability2 (1)

Every Monday for the next 47 weeks, I will be participating in Rose Fischer’s Redefining Disability Awareness Challenge. It is my hope that by sharing my stories about my disability of mental illness, that I can be a beacon of hope to others suffering the same debilitating illness.


Are your activities of daily living affected by disability?

The problem with mental illness as a disability is that since there aren’t any physical issues, generally, most people don’t understand why it is hard to get out of bed, take a shower, work a job, take care of a family, and do every day activities.

Depression steals your life away from you. You lose interest in ordinary daily activities, hobbies, associating with others, and sometimes with living. From my own perspective, my mind constantly feeds me negative thoughts, those thoughts create a huge cloud of worry and doubt over me and…

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Free on Amazon: Fox. Hunting (Fantasy Serial)

Rose F:

One more day free, folks!

Originally posted on Rose B Fischer:

Generations ago, the world of Synn was ruled by foxes. Now only the Malimore family remains to protect the Kheldor Mountains in the North. This summer, join the Malimores in a new science fantasy serial by Rose B. Fischer.

download Click to download free on Amazon

Diana is really mad at me about this, but I’m giving her story away for free this weekend to celebrate the Fourth of July.  Enjoy!

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Anne of Ingleside – Review

Originally posted on Order of Dynast:

Anne of Ingleside
L.M. Montgomery
1939

Better late than never! To continue the #greengablesreadalong challenge, I dove into Anne of Ingleside.

I’ve noticed a trend in the last couple of Anne books, mostly dealing with the society of women and what is expected of them. I do not agree with the society, but I’ve learned and come to accept that was the era these books were written in, so close to the time when women were fighting for the vote in Canada. It is a part of our history and we must realize that times were different in the past and learn from them for the future.

It was because I had these uncomfortable feelings with the past two books that I went into Anne of Ingleside a little worried. This was my second time reading it and I did not remember much. I was worried that there will be…

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Free on Amazon: Fox. Hunting (Fantasy Serial)

Generations ago, the world of Synn was ruled by foxes. Now only the Malimore family remains to protect the Kheldor Mountains in the North. This summer, join the Malimores in a new science fantasy serial by Rose B. Fischer.

download

Click to download free on Amazon

Diana is really mad at me about this, but I’m giving her story away for free this weekend to celebrate the Fourth of July.  Enjoy!

Feminist Friday: The Myth of “Girl Stories”

Originally posted on Eclectic Alli:

When I asked my friends for fantasy book recommendations for an 11 year old, they had many wonderful  suggestions.  I hadn’t mentioned the gender of the child in the original post and a few posters made assumptions which appeared to influence the recommendations they gave (much to their chagrin).  When I noticed this was happening I pointed it out, and that led into some great conversation.  One friend, Lynn, had recommended books that her son enjoyed, but noted that she “assumed the child in question was a girl, but only because she liked the Princess Bride — interesting huh?  I kind of hate to admit that.”

“It’s incredibly frustrating that parents, educators, and librarians continue to say that boys don’t have to read books that center on girls. There’s no reason that boys can’t empathize with girls, other than that we don’t teach them to. And as we continue to not teach them…

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